by Bob Beranek
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The last of the changes to the ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 is, in my opinion, the most important. Without education and training a technician doesn’t know how to do the job right and will be unable to follow a standard that doesn’t make sense to him.

Educating the industry is what I have dedicated the latter half of my career to doing. An educated workforce produces a safe, productive, professional and quality installation. The two changes to the ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 in this section are minor. There is also an addition that I feel is important to the success of the operation.

Old:

Technicians installing replacement automotive glass shall be fully qualified for the tasks they are required to perform. Such qualifications shall include, at a minimum, completion of a comprehensive training program with a final exam and a continuing education component. The program shall include, among other things:

  1. a) AGR safety issues;
  2. b) An understanding of OEM installation standards and procedures;
  3. c) Relevant technical specifications;
  4. d) Comprehensive retention system specific training; and
  5. e) The opportunity to apply and demonstrate the skills technicians learn.

New:

9.1 Technicians installing replacement automotive glass shall be fully qualified for the tasks they are required to perform. Such qualifications shall include, at a minimum, completion of a comprehensive training program with a final exam and an ongoing education component. The program shall include, among other things:

  1. a) AGR safety issues;
  2. b) An understanding of OEM installation standards and procedures;
  3. c) Relevant technical specifications;
  4. d) Adhesive system manufacturer specific comprehensive retention system training; and
  5. e) The opportunity to apply and demonstrate the skills technicians learn.

The changes to this portion of section 9 are simple. The first change simply adds a continuing education component to the training. Training cannot be given and then be allowed to stagnate. The word “ongoing” signifies the need for continuing training in the field of automotive glass installation to keep up with new vehicles, regulations and procedures.

The second change serves to address language regarding adhesive manufacturer training programs. Adhesive system manufacturers have the in-depth knowledge of how and why their sealants work. Technicians are now required to follow the guidelines for use of each specific adhesive they use, not just apply the guidelines they may use for one sealant to all.

The addition to section 9 of the standard is an important subject that must be addressed. Many times during my experience as a trainer, I have found that after I train the technicians in the proper procedures of automotive glass installation, they are confronted by co-workers and even managers that either do not understand the directives taught or refuse to change for some reason or another. For that reason we included 9.2 of the standard.

9.2 Training with respect to the content and requirements of the current version of this standard shall be required for all personnel directly involved in the automotive glass replacement process (examples: scheduling, purchasing, installing, customer service, quality control, management). Records of this training detailing content, date, participants and acknowledgement of the participant’s successful completion of the training and receipt of a printed copy of the current standard shall be maintained.

It says that any other employees that are responsible for scheduling, supplying or managing the act of installation must be trained on the part of the standard that pertains to their job. An example might be the job of customer service representative (CSR). The CSR must be aware of items that will directly influence the safety of the customer. Some of the normal every day duties of a CSR are directly related to standard compliance, such as:

  • Informing the customer of Safe-Drive-Away Times (SDAT);
  • Scheduling so the technician will have time to install and allow operation of the vehicle safely; and
  • In some cases, depending on the job description:
    • Document and keep files to demonstrate compliance to the standard for customer records, retention system files, educational files, etc.; and
    • Order the proper glass, retention systems and other supplies.

Most glass companies are doing this now, and we were very careful not to make this additional training too much of a burden. However, we did want it to be significant enough to be pertinent. We wanted to make it traceable and auditable for our companies that choose to be registered member companies of the Auto Glass Safety Council. These past weeks I have converted the new changes into easy to understand language that all can understand and follow. I hope you have found these explanations valuable and that you have implemented the changes in your company and daily installations.

The training can be as simple as providing a copy of the standard to an employee and answering any questions they may have concerning their job and their importance to the finished installation. If you then keep track of the training and document proof of compliance you will meet the standard.

Part six in our series of the ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 changes for 2015 fall under the “additional requirements” heading.

Old:

The failure of any product used in the glass installation process that the installer believes could jeopardize customer safety shall be reported promptly to the manufacturer or supplier of the product.

New:

8.5 Notification of defective product:

    • A failure or defect in any product used or intended for use in the automotive glass replacement process that could jeopardize customer safety shall be reported promptly to the manufacturer or supplier of the product.
  • Any product installed by those engaged in automotive glass replacements that is discovered to be defective or which is determined could jeopardize customer safety must be immediately reported to the customer with an offer to remedy the situation.


This portion of the standard addresses the possibility of defective products used by the technician or products discovered to be defective after the installation is complete. Customer safety is our ultimate goal so quality, defective free products and materials must be addressed.

Old:

Those engaged in automotive glass replacement shall maintain documentation to demonstrate compliance with this standard.

New:

8.7 Those engaged in automotive glass replacement shall create and retain records of each auto glass replacement for a period of at least three years from the date the work was completed sufficient to demonstrate compliance with this standard. Records, either electronic or hard-copy, shall be legible, easily identifiable and readily available. Such three-year period may be temporarily shortened for specific, clear and substantial reasons but must be adhered to when such reasons no longer exist.

This change was to benefit those companies that wanted to comply with the standard but recently began their businesses. The committee felt that those companies that began their businesses and modeled their businesses as standard-compliant entities should not be considered non-compliant for three years.

Old:

New addition

New:

8.8 Those engaged in the repair, removal or replacement of motorized windows and/or panels in automobiles that are equipped with anti-pinch mechanisms shall reset, initialize and/or confirm their proper operation before the vehicle is released to its owner. If the reset operation cannot be completed for any reason, the vehicle owner shall be informed verbally and in writing of the failure to reset.

This new addition was necessary to comply with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 118, Automatic Moving Panels. Power door glasses and automatic operating doors must have an auto reversing mechanism when the door or window has a power closing mechanism. If a door or window is accidentally activated to close, the reversing mechanism acts as a safety device to prevent the possibility of entrapment of an individuals’ body parts.

As automotive glass technicians, we must make sure that the feature is in good working order and that the reversing mechanism reacts properly to the interruption of travel. This is called re-initialization of the mechanism.

The gasket (weatherstrip) installation is quickly becoming a thing of the past. However, there are a few gasket sets still out there. The vehicles they are mounted in are being used every day to transport families and friends. The ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard 003-2015 is written to cover all vehicles with safety glass mounting, no matter what kind.

7.2 of the ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard addresses gasket set installations.

Old:

If the OEM gasket installation did not include adhesive and the vehicle is licensed for highway use, the installation shall include polyurethane or an equivalent adhesive bonding system. The following are permissible exceptions: egress applications, antique restorations, the customer’s requirements differ even after being informed about the safety implications, or in cases in which this practice conflicts with current vehicle manufacturer specifications.

New:

If the OEM gasket installation did not include adhesive and the vehicle is licensed for highway use and is less than 10,000 lbs. Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW), the installation shall include polyurethane or an equivalent adhesive bonding system. The following are permissible exceptions: egress applications, antique or classic vehicle restorations, or in cases in which this practice conflicts with current vehicle manufacturer specifications.

The key issue here are the phrases, “licensed for highway use” and “under 10,000 lbs. GVW”. This means that the vehicle carries a license plate that gives the driver unlimited use on America’s roadways, and is considered a passenger vehicle. It is not a service or commercial vehicle.

The glass parts of large trucks and service vehicles are not regulated under the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. Truck and service vehicles are required to meet different regulations monitored by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). Though the glass used in these vehicles must meet FMVSS 205 for the manufacturing of safety glass, they do not have the requirements for glass retention, airbag deployment, or roof crush that passenger vehicles require. So, this means that we are to follow the directives in our ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard in respect with passenger vehicles only.

Now don’t get me wrong, we still have the responsibility to install all glass safely. However, we have to recognize that larger service vehicles do not have the safety issues that smaller, passenger vehicles have. Plus, the larger vehicles are working vehicles that usually need to be put in service sooner rather than later. Because of this, many times, immediate use (like gasket mounted glass parts) is built into the design of the vehicle.

What is a classic or antique automobile?

The Classic Car Club of America maintains that a car must be between 30 and 49 years old to be a classic, while cars between 50 and 99 fall into a pre-antique class. Cars that are 100 years and older fall into the antique class. While the Antique Automobile Club of America defines an antique car as 25 years or older. A classic is defined as 20–49 years old.

As you can see, there is no definitive definition of these types of automobiles, so I use the license plate definition of classic or antique. All states have licensing of special older vehicles, but the criterion used to designate one from another is different from state to state. The key point is the mileage restrictions.

Older vehicles exist because either they were well taken care of or they are vintage collectable vehicles. Antique or classic vehicles are usually pampered and driven few miles because the owner wants to enjoy the era that the vehicle represents. Or it is kept for investment purposes. Either way it is usually tagged with a special license plate that has a wide range of restrictions that limits its use and miles driven. These specially licensed vehicles are exempted from our ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard.

However, if the older vehicle just happens to be well taken care of, is licensed for the roadway like any other vehicle, is under 10,000 lbs. GVW and utilizes a gasket for its glass mounting, then the ANSI/AGSC/AGRSS™ Standard applies and the glass installation must meet the standard as written.

Simply put, vehicles that have gasket set stationary glass and are licensed for the roadway as unrestricted must follow the Standard. Those that are specially licensed do not apply.